Course Overview

The study of history deepens and enriches our understanding of the world in which we live. It does this though analysing people and society in the past and how that past shapes the present.

History is also the study of change - change from one type of society to another, from one way of thinking to another. This cultivates a flexibility of thought and an ability to adapt to new circumstances and ideas. The history modules take a broad approach, they

  • cover a range of periods from the Middle Ages to the present
  • look at the historical experience of Ireland, Europe and the world
  • examine major themes in human development
  • analyse the processes of social and cultural change
  • identify crucial turning points in Irish and world history

Applications and Selections

 Online applications will reopen in April 2021.

 

 

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

All modules in the Diploma are individually assessed. Modules are assessed by a combination of written assignments, online activities and extended essays.

This is a two-year, part-time programme. This course is delivered by blended learning, with online content as well as (8) monthly Saturday workshops throughout the academic year.

Basic computer skills will be an advantage. E-mail, internet and NUI Galway's online learning environment are in use throughout the course.

All applicants, whose first language is not English, or who have not been educated through the medium of the English language during their two most recent years of study, must present one of the following qualifications in the English language: IELTS: 6.5 or TOEFL (IBT): 92. Please see this webpage for further information: https://www.nuigalway.ie/international-students/english.html

Candidates who are 21 years or over on or before January 1 st of year of entry may gain entry to the programme on the basis of mature years. Candidates under 21 years should meet the minimum matriculation requirements as outlined in the Frequently Asked Questions section.

 

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

There are no specific entry requirements for the Diploma in History.

Candidates who are 21 years or over on or before January 1 st of year of entry may gain entry to the programme on the basis of mature years. Candidates under 21 years should meet the minimum matriculation requirements as outlined in the Frequently Asked Questions section.


Additional Requirements

Duration

2 years, part-time

Next start date

September 2021

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

Unlimited

Closing Date

NFQ level

7

Mode of study

Blended Learning

ECTS weighting

30

Award

Diploma

CAO

Course code

Course Outline

The programme modules focus on specific periods in history. There are six modules on offer within the diploma structure. Students are required to complete three modules each year.  The programme introduces some new approaches to history and also introduces a number of key themes and concepts in history including revisionism, oral history, gender history, war and society.

 

Curriculum Information

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Module
An examinable portion of a subject or course, for which you attend lectures and/or tutorials and carry out assignments. E.g. Algebra and Calculus could be modules within the subject Mathematics. Each module has a unique module code eg. MA140.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (15 Credits)

Required HI3302: Ireland: A Social and Cultural History, 1850 - Present


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module will be divided into four units, each which will address a key theme in the social and cultural history of Ireland from the end of the Great Famine to the present time. . Throughout, students will be encouraged to engage with a wide array of sources and historical debates, both online and in workshops.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. 1) Understand the social and cultural history of Ireland in the aftermath of the Great Famine.
  2. 2) Examine and interpret historical debates and controversies.
  3. 3) Interrogate both secondary and primary source materials.
  4. 4) Present written work which is well-organised, well-argued and well-written
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Social change and everyday life in Ireland 1850-1922" by Caitriona Clear
    ISBN: 9780719074370.
    Publisher: Manchester ; Manchester University Press, 2007.
  2. "The Transformation of Ireland 1900-2000" by Diarmaid Ferriter
    ISBN: 9781861974433.
    Publisher: Profile Books Ltd
The above information outlines module HI3302: "Ireland: A Social and Cultural History, 1850 - Present" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required HI3301: Europe in the Age of the French Revolution


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This survey course introduces students to the political events and social and economic changes in Europe from the eve of the French Revolution to the consolidation of nation-states in the second half of the nineteenth century.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the main developments in European history from 1789 to the mid-nineteenth century relating them to the medium-term ramifications of the French Revolution.
  2. Recognize the variety of approaches historians take to the past (political, social, military and economic history)
  3. Appreciate the importance of survey knowledge, enabling a long view of history to evaluate the context in which the modern language of politics emerged from the French Revolutionary era.
  4. Locate and investigate -using a booklist, asic library resources and online resources - suitable secondary readings for personal study to reinforce directed learning (online and in tutorials) with a view to contextualizing suitable primary source materials.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "A History of Modern Europe: From the French Revolution to the Present" by John Merriman
    ISBN: 9780393933857.
    Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  2. "The Norton history of modern Europe: The Revolutionary Era, 1789-1850" by Charles Breunig & Matthew Levinger
    ISBN: 978039397860.
    Publisher: W.W. Norton
The above information outlines module HI3301: "Europe in the Age of the French Revolution " and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required HI3300: Reform, Revolt and Revolution in Early Modern Europe


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

At the beginning of the sixteenth century, western Europeans shared a common religious identity as members of the Catholic church. By 1563, European society had altered irrevocably, with the unity wrought by religious affiliation replaced by an array of conflicting churches and sects. This period, commonly known as the Reformation, was an era of unprecedented change in European history, with enormous and enduring significance for the political and cultural development of Europe. This module will trace the inauspicious beginnings of the Reformation in 1517, when the scholarly monk Martin Luther defied pope and emperor by refusing to retract his criticisms of catholic doctrines and devotions, such as indulgences. It will examine the origins of the protest, asking what longer term political, cultural and social trends contributed to its outbreak, and transformed an isolated intellectual debate into a revolution.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Outtine the narrative of events that formed the ‘Reformation’ in the sixteenth century;
  2. Describe a range of relevant historical interpretations of the events of the Reformation;
  3. Assess critically the historical events and relevant scholarship of the Reformation.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Reformation" by Diarmaid MacCulloch
    ISBN: 9780140285345.
    Publisher: Penguin
The above information outlines module HI3300: "Reform, Revolt and Revolution in Early Modern Europe" and is valid from 2017 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Year 2 (15 Credits)

Optional HI4401: Politics, War and Revolution in Ireland 1905-23


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The years 1905 to 1923 witnessed fierce debates on Ireland’s future. Increasing numbers of nationalist and unionists, men and women, moved from politics to direct action and armed struggle. This module begins by looking at the conflict between Unionists and Home Rulers, leading to the formation of volunteer forces. It considers the impact of World War I on Irish politics and examines the involvement of Irishmen in the war. It explores the motivations of those involved in the 1916 Rising and the events leading to Partition, the War of Independence and Civil War. How can we investigate these events? How can we discover people’s perceptions and motivations? The module draws on eye witness accounts, newspapers, film footage, newsreels and private correspondence and questions their reliability. It also considers why historians have disagreed in their interpretations.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Identify the most significant political developments in Ireland from 1912 to 1923
  2. Explain the motivations of key figures
  3. Assess the impact of European events on Irish politics
  4. Evaluate the usefulness of primary sources such as witness statements, memoirs, newspapers, newsreels and private correspondence
  5. Analyse the reasons for conflicting interpretations of the period
  6. Present written work that is well-argued and well-researched, demonstrating a good understanding of the issues and the period
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The Irish Revolution, 1916-1923" by Marie Coleman
    ISBN: 140827910X.
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
  2. "Vivid Faces: The Revolutionary Generation in Ireland: 1890-1923" by R. F. Foster
    ISBN: 024195424X.
    Publisher: Penguin
  3. "Our War: Ireland and the Great War" by John Horne
    ISBN: 1904890504.
    Publisher: Royal Irish Academy
The above information outlines module HI4401: "Politics, War and Revolution in Ireland 1905-23" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional HI4402: Medieval Ireland 5th-9th Century


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module comprises a survey of the history, politics, culture, literature and society of Ireland in the Early Middle Ages (from c. AD 400 to c. AD 800). It traces the transition from a so-called 'tribal' society to one in which 'dynastic' politics are the norm, and explains how that change is reflected in society. It ends with an assessment of the Viking impact in Ireland. The lectures cover such themes as Early Irish (Brehon) law and institutions; politics and society; the origins of Irish artistic and literary culture; the beginnings of Christianity and the later evolution of the Irish Church; the Irish abroad, and the Vikings. Students are introduced to some of the original documentary material used by historians.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the main developments in Ireland between 500 and 800
  2. Demonstrate familiarity with the primary sources for the history of Ireland 500-800
  3. Debate received opinions on historical topics in Ireland 500-800
  4. Demonstrate the necessary writing skills to complete a well-argued essay on a particular aspect of Ireland, 500-800
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Early medieval Ireland, 400-1200" by Dáibhí Ó Cróinín
    ISBN: 0582015650.
    Publisher: Longman
  2. "A New History of Ireland, Volume I" by Daibhi O Croinin (Editor)
    ISBN: 0199226652.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  3. "Early Christian Ireland" by T. M. Charles-Edwards
    ISBN: 0521037166.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
The above information outlines module HI4402: "Medieval Ireland 5th-9th Century" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional HI4400: Technology and Society 1750-1930


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will examine the dynamics of technological innovation and its socio-economic context and consequences. The focus will be on Europe and North America in the period 1750-1930 during the so-called 'First' and 'Second' Industrial Revolutions. The study will proceed thematically covering particular sectors including communications, industrial production, food production, transport, medicine, art, and literature.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe and recount the key sectoral changes and how they are related to each other
  2. Distinguish between technological invention and innovation and explain failure and success
  3. Assess why some societies and social contexts might be more inventive/innovative than others
  4. Discuss and critique reification and the usefulness of determinism in the history of technology
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of aesthetic and artistic responses to technology
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "A social history of American technology" by Ruth Schwartz Cowan
    ISBN: 0195046056.
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
  2. "nomic Progress The lever of riches: Technological Creativity and Eco" by Joel Mokyr
    ISBN: 0195074777.
    Publisher: New York ; Oxford University Press, 1990
The above information outlines module HI4400: "Technology and Society 1750-1930" and is valid from 2018 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Further Education

Students of the course may progress to the part-time BA programme.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

This course would benefit those who work in a related area.

 

Who’s Suited to This Course

The Diploma in History is suitable for anyone who is interested in enhancing their historical understanding of Ireland, Europe and the world. It offers an introduction to a variety of time periods and thematic topics, exploring the historical roots of the present.

In practical terms, people working in heritage centres and the tourism industry, who may require knowledge of history and cultural issues in their working lives, would benefit from this course.

Equally, it may be of interest to teachers, primary and secondary, who wish to refresh their knowledge of history for classroom teaching.

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€970 p.a.

Fees: Tuition

Fees: Student levy

Fees: Non EU

€1,470 p.a.


A fees scholarship of up to 30% may be available for students who wish to upskill for the purposes of re-employment.  Students must be registered as unemployed and in receipt of one of the following: 

  • Job-seekers Benefit
  • Job-seekers Allowance
  • One-parent family allowance
  • Disability allowance
  • Community Employment Scheme
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Signing for social insurance contribution credits

Please download the 2018_19 Fees Scholarship Form for more information.

Find out More

Lucy O'Neill

Centre for Adult Learning and Professional Development
NUI Galway, Nuns' Island
Galway
Tel: 091 492144
Fax: 091 525051
E-mail: lucy.oneill@nuigalway.ie

 

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What Our Students Say

 

 

Tom

Tom Randles |   Past Student

The NUIG Diploma in History was a really enjoyable and enriching experience. Modules varied from the classical Greek period to modern Irish economic history, right up to the Celtic Tiger period. We had the top lecturers from the discipline and all were approachable and helpful. The option to complete a continuous assessment essay instead of an exam, took the pressure off ‘mature’ students not too keen on exams at this stage of our careers! The local history project assignment was a particular highlight for me.